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SUP’ing and Safety

bone and joint health Jul 16, 2018

Standup paddleboarding (SUP) is a watersport that is rapidly growing in popularity. The Sports and Fitness Industry Association showed in the past three years, participation in standup paddleboarding has increased by nearly 120 percent. That’s more than other fast-growing sports including adventure racing, MMA, rugby and BMX.

 
Standup paddleboarding has the potential for wide appeal because just about anyone can do it. Even beginners can have a great time, as there are a wonderful variety of boards out there - even super-stable boards that are almost hard to tip over. It’s a great way to be out in nature and “unplug”, and has potential for great exercise as well. 


You can paddleboard in a number of aquatic environments - the ocean, rivers and lakes. Remember however, safety is important in any body of water. 


It’s always a good idea (and in some places, law!) to wear a personal flotation device (PFD), or otherwise known as a life jacket....
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Nutrition for the Active Adult, with Niki Strealy, RDN, LD

bone and joint health Jun 06, 2018
As a sports medicine orthopaedic surgeon, I work with athletes of many levels. One area that we don’t always get to touch on when focusing on injury is nutrition and its importance. This is where we rely heavily on our Registered Dietitian Nutritionists for solid advice. I’m honored to have Niki Strealy, RDN, LD of Strategic Nutrition talk to us about nutrition for the active adult. Not only is she a seasoned professional, she herself is a runner and a track coach. Who better to bring together nutrition and sports?

Thanks, Niki, for being a part of my blog!
 

 
As a registered dietitian nutritionist, it’s my role to look at what clients eat and make recommendations. I am also a marathon runner and track coach; I know first-hand “If you don’t put fuel in the car it won’t go."
 
Calculating Protein Needs
How much protein do you need? It depends on a number of factors, including your gender, age, activity...
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I’m a new parent...what the heck is going on with my joints!?

bone and joint health May 29, 2018
I recently partnered up with a friend and colleague, Natalie Willes - Baby Sleep Trainer, in helping her share her knowledge about getting babies to sleep on a routine. Although my son is a first grader now, it reminded me of those new mom days. Aside from the sleep challenges, I remembered how many new aches and pains I had.

Did you know as a new parent, you may lift your baby 50 times a day? The extra bending, stopping and lifting can create strain on your joints. And as your child grows, this strain becomes even more magnified.

Several common orthopaedic conditions crop up around postpartum - for mom and dad both! Here are some of the most common:
 
Dequervain’s Tenosynovitis
- Also called “New Mother’s Wrist”, this is a condition where the tendon’s sheath, or covering, becomes inflamed due to repeated lifting. When your hand and wrist are in the “handshake” position, then you lift upwards (like when you are holding a baby under...
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Respect the Stairs

bone and joint health May 29, 2018

I’m thrilled to introduce my first guest blogger, board-certified orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Barbara Bergin! She and two colleagues founded Austin’s Texas Orthopedics, Sports & Rehabilitation Associates in 1986, and since then it has grown into a group of 37 orthopedic surgeons, physiatrists and a rheumatologist. Dr. Bergin is also an author, publishing her first novel, ENDINGS, in 2007. She is working on a second novel, THE WISH, and has a pending contract for her first non-fiction, SIT LIKE A MAN. An experienced equestrienne, she actively competes in the western sport of Reining, and has won national honors. She is passionate about songwriting and playing her guitar, and has just finished recording her first CD, BLOOD RED MOON, which should be released this fall.

Dr. Bergen is one of my inspirations in blogging, and she sets the bar high. Check out her blog at www.drbarbarabergin.com!

I cannot agree with Dr. Bergen more, when she says...

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Staying Healthy on the Tennis Courts

bone and joint health May 19, 2018
It doesn’t matter if you’re a beginner (like me) or a pro, there are many things you can do to prevent injuries on the tennis court. Did you know in 2007, more than 21,000 people were treated in the US for tennis-related injuries?

Here are a few tips to avoid injury on the courts:

Environment:
- When playing outdoors, dress appropriately for the weather and don’t forget sunscreen and a hat.
- Court surfaces - surfaces such as cement, asphalt or synthetic aren’t very forgiving. Consider inserts to absorb shock to protect your back and other joints when playing on harder surfaces.


 
Preparation:
- Take time to warm up and stretch. Start with at least 3-5 minutes of light aerobic exercise , such as a light jog, jumping jacks, running or stationary cycling. Follow with gentle static stretching, holding your stretches for 30 seconds or more.
- Start slow with your strokes and gradually build up to your maximum pace.
- A great resource for general exercise safety...
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Basketball Safety

bone and joint health May 07, 2018

As the weather warms up, hitting the courts is looking more and more attractive. Recreational basketball is a great full-body workout, but don’t forget important safety tips to avoid injury.

Data reported by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) showed that in 2016,

  • 60,509 people for basketball-related foot injuries
  • 355,130 people for basketball-related ankle injuries
  • 186,464 people for basketball-related knee juries


The AAOS recommends the following basketball safety tips:

  • Proper Preparation for Play. Maintain physical activity by sticking to a balanced fitness program during the off-season. Always warm up and stretch before beginning play. Research has shown that cold muscles are more prone to injury. Warm up with jumping jacks, stationary cycling or running or walking in place for 3 to 5 minutes, especially cold winter months when basketball is frequently played.
  • Focus on Technique. Players at all levels benefit from good coaching to assist with proper...
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Vitamin D...Game Changer???

bone and joint health Apr 17, 2018

In the sunshine-starved city of Portland (especially NOW...summer, where ARE you???), vitamin D should be on your radar.  Recent studies bring to light (pun intended!) the importance of Vitamin D for muscle strength, injury prevention for all - and especially for those interested in sports performance.  


new review article in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, vitamin D supplements help increase muscle strength in athletes who are vitamin D deficient. Higher levels have also been linked to injury prevention and improving athletic performance. 

“Vitamin D deficiency commonly affects many people around the world,” said lead study author and orthopaedic surgeon Geoffrey D. Abrams, MD. “With higher serum levels of vitamin D playing a role in muscle strength, injury prevention, and sports performance, it’s essential for individuals to take necessary steps to ensure they’re getting an adequate amount of...

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What does it take to become an orthopaedic surgeon?

Uncategorized Apr 13, 2018

I was recently asked by a friend, who had a teenage child who is interested in becoming an orthopaedic surgeon, “what does it take to become an orthopaedic surgeon?”


In total, from the time one graduates from high school, it takes a minimum of 13 years of schooling/training to become an orthopaedic surgeon. That’s 4 years of college, 4 years of medical school, 5 years of residency training as a “junior” doctor and then if a subspecialty is desired, another 1-2 years of training. Orthopaedic surgeons can subspecialize in sports medicine (like I did), orthopaedic oncology, spine, adult reconstruction (that’s joint replacements), pediatric orthopaedics, foot/ankle reconstruction, shoulder/elbow, hand - to name a few.

Not all college graduates decide to go straight through to medical school, with some individuals taking time off to travel, obtain a graduate degree, work or perform research. Personally, I took a non-traditional path as I hadn’t...

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OrthopAEdics or OrthopEdics?

Uncategorized Mar 28, 2018

What's in a name? 

I came across a letter to the editor in the AAOS Now publication, the member publication for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons entitled, "Which is Correct: OrthopEdics or OrthopAEdics?" by Dr. Nikolaos Christodoulou of Athens.  

"OrthopAEdics” and “OrthopEdics” are derived from orthopédie, coined by 17th -century French physician Nicholas Andry de Bois-Regard. The words are derived from the Greek word ὀρθός (orthos), which means “correct” or “straight”, and παιδίον (paidion), which means “child”. As the etymology implies, orthopédie referenced the practice as the treatment of childhood spine deformities. Today, orthopAEdics has grown to encompass a diverse array of treatments going well beyond the spine, treating all age groups.

Dr. Christodoulou argues that the "E" version is the spelling most used in modern electronic...

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