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Kitchen Mishaps! Knives and Avocados

 

Love avocados, but hate cutting them…..they are slippery little rascals and are responsible for many nasty hand injuries.

Stab wounds from using knives in the kitchen are not fun but are reported daily. Accidental self-inflicted knife injuries to digits are a common cause of tendon and nerve injury requiring hand surgery.

Many of us do not think about how much you use “your hands for your senses”!

Until you lose that ability of sensation, not just functional implications, but how else do you recognize hot, cold or pain but by touch.

 

Kitchen Knife and Avocado Statistics

The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates over 137,000 people receive hospital treatments for injuries from kitchen knives every year.

There has been an apparent increase in avocado injuries due to the way people hold the fruit in the hand. Therefore, dubbed “avocado hand”, has spread as one plastic surgeon in England says, into an epidemic and suggests that avocados...

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Should I sit or should I stand…are standing desks good for you?

education Oct 30, 2018

Sit-stand desks are becoming increasingly popular, and have been touted as solutions for reducing obesity, combating cardiovascular disease, premature death.

The British Medical Journal published a study this month that looked at a sit-stand desk and its effects on prolonged sitting and physical activity as well as psychological and work-related health. They found that giving the worker this desk promoted less sitting, and using self-reported evaluations, the workers noted a positive change in work engagement, occupational fatigue, daily anxiety and quality of life. 

It’s important however when studies come out, to look at them with a critical eye. When a study uses self-reports, that always introduces the possibility of bias. Reporting one's own experience is very subjective. 

Also - it’s important to note that while there were some positive benefits reported in this study, it doesn’t necessarily measure whether one is less likely to be obese, have heart...

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Your Orthopaedic Surgeon Will Tell You That You Should DEFINITELY Smoke Cigarettes If...

...you want to wait extra loooong for your fracture to heal
...you want to have a higher risk of surgical complications, like infection or problems healing your wound
...you're okay with developing osteoporosis
...you want to be more likely to develop overuse injuries, like bursitis or tendonitis - and take longer to recover
...you want to have a detrimental effect on your athletic performance
...you want to have more pain after a surgery

Sound attractive? I would guess not for most.

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As an orthopaedic surgeon, I treat many acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions, including fractures, sprains, strains, tendon/ligament injuries and bursitis.  I often discuss with smokers the risks above - not to mention the risks of smoking that first come to mind...the damaging effects on the heart and lungs.  Many individuals are unfamiliar with the fact that smoking can even affect the health of the bones and joints.
 

 

The quick and dirty on why smoking affects...
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Do All Rotator Cuff Tears Need To Be Fixed?

education shoulders Aug 04, 2018
PictureYour doctor tells you that you have a rotator cuff tear...now what?

The rotator cuff is a group of tendons that connect muscle to the top of your humerus at the shoulder. These tendons are important because they help give you the strength to be able to lift you arm as well as rotate it. You need your rotator cuff to be able to reach a lightbulb, swing a tennis racket, or even to scratch the back of your head.
 
Tears of these tendons can occur traumatically (due to an accident or injury), but what many people don’t realize is that they can exist with no symptoms at all. The latter is more common as individuals age. Up to 20% in their 50s-60s and one third to half of individuals in their 70s-80s can have a tear with no symptoms at all.

Do all tears NEED to be fixed? The answer is it depends! Not all tears necessarily need to be fixed. Surgeons will often observe tears that don’t show any symptoms. However, if individual has weakness or pain that isn’t relieved...
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I’m a new parent...what the heck is going on with my joints!?

I recently partnered up with a friend and colleague, Natalie Willes - Baby Sleep Trainer, in helping her share her knowledge about getting babies to sleep on a routine. Although my son is a first grader now, it reminded me of those new mom days. Aside from the sleep challenges, I remembered how many new aches and pains I had.

Did you know as a new parent, you may lift your baby 50 times a day? The extra bending, stopping and lifting can create strain on your joints. And as your child grows, this strain becomes even more magnified.

Several common orthopaedic conditions crop up around postpartum - for mom and dad both! Here are some of the most common:
 
Dequervain’s Tenosynovitis
- Also called “New Mother’s Wrist”, this is a condition where the tendon’s sheath, or covering, becomes inflamed due to repeated lifting. When your hand and wrist are in the “handshake” position, then you lift upwards (like when you are holding a baby under...
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Respect the Stairs

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I’m thrilled to introduce my first guest blogger, board-certified orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Barbara Bergin! She and two colleagues founded Austin’s Texas Orthopedics, Sports & Rehabilitation Associates in 1986, and since then it has grown into a group of 37 orthopedic surgeons, physiatrists and a rheumatologist. Dr. Bergin is also an author, publishing her first novel, ENDINGS, in 2007. She is working on a second novel, THE WISH, and has a pending contract for her first non-fiction, SIT LIKE A MAN. An experienced equestrienne, she actively competes in the western sport of Reining, and has won national honors. She is passionate about songwriting and playing her guitar, and has just finished recording her first CD, BLOOD RED MOON, which should be released this fall.

Dr. Bergen is one of my inspirations in blogging, and she sets the bar high. Check out her blog at www.drbarbarabergin.com!

I cannot agree with Dr. Bergen more, when she says...

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Staying Healthy on the Tennis Courts

It doesn’t matter if you’re a beginner (like me) or a pro, there are many things you can do to prevent injuries on the tennis court. Did you know in 2007, more than 21,000 people were treated in the US for tennis-related injuries?

Here are a few tips to avoid injury on the courts:

Environment:
- When playing outdoors, dress appropriately for the weather and don’t forget sunscreen and a hat.
- Court surfaces - surfaces such as cement, asphalt or synthetic aren’t very forgiving. Consider inserts to absorb shock to protect your back and other joints when playing on harder surfaces.


 
Preparation:
- Take time to warm up and stretch. Start with at least 3-5 minutes of light aerobic exercise , such as a light jog, jumping jacks, running or stationary cycling. Follow with gentle static stretching, holding your stretches for 30 seconds or more.
- Start slow with your strokes and gradually build up to your maximum pace.
- A great resource for general exercise safety...
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What does it take to become an orthopaedic surgeon?

I was recently asked by a friend, who had a teenage child who is interested in becoming an orthopaedic surgeon, “what does it take to become an orthopaedic surgeon?”

In total, from the time one graduates from high school, it takes a minimum of 13 years of schooling/training to become an orthopaedic surgeon. That’s 4 years of college, 4 years of medical school, 5 years of residency training as a “junior” doctor and then if a subspecialty is desired, another 1-2 years of training. Orthopaedic surgeons can subspecialize in sports medicine (like I did), orthopaedic oncology, spine, adult reconstruction (that’s joint replacements), pediatric orthopaedics, foot/ankle reconstruction, shoulder/elbow, hand - to name a few.

Not all college graduates decide to go straight through to medical school, with some individuals taking time off to travel, obtain a graduate degree, work or perform research. Personally, I took a non-traditional path as I hadn’t...

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